Are diapers tested on animals? The Top Cruelty-Free Diapers in 2021

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Cruelty-free diapers

Cruelty-free beauty, cruelty-free food, cruelty-free cleaning products. We’re all pretty used to the idea of animal testing when it comes to these items, but have you ever thought about cruelty-free diapers? More and more parents and carers are considering the impact their diaper choices have on little one’s skin and on the environment, but it might be time for us all to start thinking about diapers and their impact on animals… 

It’s hard to believe, but diapers are pretty commonly tested on animals. It’s 2021 guys. There is absolutely no need to test on animals when there are so many alternatives. Why else would numerous companies manage to produce some seriously amazing beauty, household, and food products without testing on innocent animals?

Luckily, the cruelty-free diaper revolution has begun, with a big list of diaper brands now declaring themselves cruelty-free. So which brands are leading the way?

Are diapers tested on animals?

Frustratingly, diapers are pretty commonly tested on animals, not that brands are quick to declare this, of course. They conduct testing, apparently, in order to check for skin allergy reactions (because animal skin is the same as human skin, right…). 

The other aspect of animal testing to consider is who owns the diaper brand. Big brands like Pampers and Huggies are owned by huge corporations: Procter and Gamble and Kimberly Clark. These corporations test a huge variety of their products on animals by their own admission, including beauty products and household cleaning products. So while it might be tough to find out whether their diaper materials are tested on animals directly – they’re not exactly transparent with this information – by avoiding them, you’re not contributing to any of these cruel practices. 

Are there vegan diapers?

Vegan food and vegan beauty products are on our radar as a society now, and it’s more important than ever, with the meat and dairy industries doing pretty terrible things to our health and the environment, to eat as many plant-based whole foods as possible. And vegan beauty is so readily available that it’s super easy to avoid products tested on animals and products containing animal-derived ingredients. But what about diapers?

Of course, staying completely away from animal testing and animal-derived ingredients will be a requirement of any diaper that calls itself vegan.

Luckily, there aren’t necessarily any obvious animal products in diapers on the market currently, and there are heaps of brands that label their diapers vegan. Even though diapers don’t have to be eco-friendly to be vegan, many who choose to live vegan lifestyles do so for the environment, given that it takes 3 times the amount of water to produce food for a meat-eater compared to someone on a plant-based diet. And the environment plays a huge factor in the manufacture of diapers…

Can you buy eco-friendly diapers?

Something to consider when it comes to the eco-friendly-ness of a diaper is what it’s made from. Is it mostly oil-based plastics and other unsustainable materials, or does it use predominantly plant-based or vegan materials like bamboo and wood pulp? Many of the bigger name brands use oil-based plastics, adhesives, and dyes in their diapers, along with chlorine bleaching: the Cruella Deville of diapers. While chlorine bleaching isn’t really harmful to your baby’s skin, it’s awful for the environment. It’s used to make diapers more absorbent, but there are many more eco-friendly ways of doing this. So why is chlorine still used? It’s cheaper, shockingly. It’s pretty awful that the companies who make the most profit tend to be the ones determined to manufacture their diapers in the cheapest, most harmful way. But don’t panic – it can be easily avoided!

Eco-conscious disposable diaper companies will often label their diapers ‘totally chlorine-free’, which, of course, is ideal. The other label you might see is ‘elemental chlorine free’. While these diapers aren’t perfect as chlorine is still being used, this process reduces toxicity, so they’re arguably better than diapers that use regular chlorine bleaching. 

And it’s not just the making of diapers we have to consider when finding eco-friendly diapers. It’s no surprise that the vast majority of disposable diapers end up in landfills. In fact, and this is a pretty horrible fact, about 20 billion diapers end up here every year, and each of these diapers takes about 500 years to decompose. 

Of course, there’s no way to avoid this if you’re using non-compostable diapers. But using cloth diapers certainly does, as well as biodegradable disposable diapers.

 ‘Biodegradable’ is the new buzzword when it comes to the eco-friendly diaper market, and these diapers can be decomposed in your back garden (the non-poopy ones, anyway) rather than sent on a lovely journey to huge landfill sites. Of course, brands who tend to produce these kinds of diapers will not only care for the environment, but for animals, and so will usually be completely cruelty-free and vegan. 

Related Post: Top Picks for the Best Biodegradable Diapers on the Market

PETA and their cruelty-free lists

PETA – People For The Ethical Treatment Of Animals – provides a super handy guide to the best cruelty-free diapers and explains how animals needn’t suffer to make great diapers. They list the following brands as ‘cruelty-free’ and all of them feature the PETA logo:

Peta Crulety-free Diaper Companies list:

  • The Honest Company
  • Parasol
  • Attitude
  • Wholefoods 365
  • Drylock Technologies
  • Lillydoo
  • Love and Green
  • Mega Disposables S.A
  • Offspring
  • PUREBORN
  • Seventh Generation
  • Sposie
  • Tamboor

Of course, cloth and reusable diapers are generally also cruelty-free.

So, apart from rejecting animal testing, what makes these diapers so awesome, and where can you buy them?

Cruelty-free Diapers that feature the PETA logo

1. Parasol Diapers

What materials do they use?

Parasol diapers are a fab cruelty-free diaper choice. They’re made from chlorine-free wood pulp from certified forests, are hypoallergenic, so great for little ones with sensitive skin, and have great absorbency. 

What do they avoid?

The list of nasty additions often found in diapers that Parasol is all the more reason to love them! They steer completely clear of chemicals, latex, phthalates, lotions, alcohol, fragrances, and dyes, which I guess you’d expect with a diaper suitable for sensitive skin. 

Are they biodegradable?

Unfortunately, this is the only bit that lets them down – they’re not compostable. 

Where can you buy them?

You can subscribe to Parasol diapers on their website or you can get them from Amazon or Sam’s Club.

How much are they?

Looking on their site, 80 size 1 diapers per month costs around 36 dollars. This is a little more than some similar subscription services, but you can save cash by becoming a VIP Parasol Member. All you need to do is buy a member box (84 dollars), which features 3 giant diaper packs, and you’ll get 45% off your next box, as well as 20% of other Parasol baby products for life. And not only is Parasol an eco-friendly, cruelty-free company, but they’re also charitable too; right now, they’re donating 10 dollars to a COVID-19 charity of choice when you spend 60 bucks. 

The bottom line

It’s a shame they’re not biodegradable, but they’re a great cruelty-free option for sensitive skin, and are delivered straight to your door!

2. Seventh Generation Diapers

What materials do they use?

Unlike many diaper brands, which make finding a full list of materials used as tough as getting a toddler to sit quietly for more than 4 minutes (it ain’t happening), the super-popular Seventh Generation is very transparent when it comes to ingredients used. Their diapers are made from totally chlorine-free wood fluff pulp, adhesives, polymer spandex, sodium polyacrylate, polypropylene, polyurethane, and inks. And no, I’m not quite sure what all the polys are either, apart from some variation of plastic. To be fair to Seventh Generation, many predominantly plant-based diapers do still contain some plastic in there somewhere… 

What do they avoid?

Their Free & Clear diapers stay away from potential irritants like fragrances and lotions, so are suitable for little ones with sensitive skin. Their brand new Sensitive Protection diapers with ‘Futures’ prints are also free from irritants like lotions, chlorine, and fragrances, so that’s a tick for baby’s skin and for the environment. 

The thing that surprises me about Seventh Generation, though, is the lack of clarity provided on phthalates – my arch-nemesis. Phthalates are potentially harmful chemicals used in all sorts of household products like flooring, children’s toys and, you guessed it, diapers. They should be avoided like the plague. Sorry to be blunt, but phthalates have been linked to an increased risk of asthma in little ones (1), as well as abnormal genital development in little boys. Screw you, phthalates!

So what about Seventh Generation – do they use them? Surprisingly, there’s no mention of their diaper being phthalate-free, although the company does talk about these nasties on their site in a blog post about concerning chemicals. The problem is, although they clearly state that their hand wash is free from phthalates, I can’t for the life of me find out whether their diapers are too. I just don’t understand why, if they do steer clear from phthalates in their diapers, they don’t shout about it from the rooftops? Sort it out, people…

Are they biodegradable?

Unfortunately, although Seventh Generation diapers are made from 70% plant-based materials, they can’t be composted. 

Where can I buy them?

Seventh Generation are one of the most popular and readily available eco-friendly (or friendlier, at least) diapers on the market. They’re available to buy on Amazon and in major grocery stores like Walmart and Walgreens.

How much are they?

The price of Seventh Generation diapers will of course depend on the size you need and where you get them from, but Amazon makes it very clear how much you’re paying per diaper. Seventh Generation’s brand new diaper variety – Sensitive Protection future prints – will set you back around 25 dollars for an 80 pack of size 1 diapers. This is about 31 cents per diaper. Unsurprisingly, the bigger sizes work out more expensive, with their size 6s setting you back 54 cents per diaper. 

The good thing about buying your diapers from Amazon is their Family Program. It’s completely free for Prime members and you’ll get up to 20% off the diaper and baby food subscriptions. Plus, getting your diapers delivered straight to your door saves carting them back from the grocery store.

The bottom line

So Seventh Generation might be easily accessible and somewhat eco-friendly, but, arguably, they don’t go far enough. The company states that they want to protect the planet for future generations, so it’s hoped that they’re working on a diaper that can be composted, like so many other brands provide. 

The other downside is that they’re owned by Unilever, another absolutely huge company that appears to own… well, just about everything really. Think Lipton, Hellmann’s, Dove, Simple, and Carte D’or, to name just a few! 

While some of Unilever’s brands are certified cruelty free, many aren’t, and the corporation still carries out animal testing. Granted, they are finally taking measures to stamp it out once and for all, but if you want to completely avoid companies who test, it might be worth steering clear of Seventh Generation.

3. Attitude Diapers

A box of Attitude Diapers

What Materials Do They Use?

Attitude diapers are completely vegan and free from animal cruelty – they’re even PETA certified. You can’t get better than that! They use chlorine-free wood fluff pulp from FSC certified forests, which is great news for the environment. 

What Do They Avoid?

  • No BPA
  • No alcohol
  • No fragrances
  • No dyes
  • No lotions
  • No chlorine
  • No phthalates

Are They Biodegradable?

Attitude diapers are made with 50% biodegradable materials. There aren’t any fully biodegradable disposable baby diapers on the market, so 50% is actually pretty good. They’re still made with some plastic, like every disposable is, even the eco-friendliest ones.

Where Can You Buy Them?

Attitude diapers are lesser known than some other cruelty-free diapers, but you can buy them online – at Amazon or on Attitude’s own site.

How Much Are They?

As with most eco-friendly diapers, Attitude’s offerings will set you back a little more than the budget options. But if your budget can stretch to it, it’s totally worth it – for your little one and for their future!

A pack of size 4 diapers costs about 16 bucks, or about 61 cents each. Size 1-2 diapers are a little less – about 44 cents each.

The Bottom Line

While they’re a little more expensive than some similar brands, Attitude’s cruelty-free, non-toxic and biodegradable diapers are worth every cent!

4. Sposie diaper pads

What materials do they use?

Sposie produces booster pads for diapers. You might use them if your little one is prone to leaks, as they ‘double’ their absorbency. 

Sposie booster pads are made from spunlace fabric, which are cloth-like fibers, tissue paper, fluff-pulp, and non-toxic super absorbent gel. They’re hypoallergenic, so suitable for little ones with sensitive skin, cruelty-free, and tested by dermatologists.

What do they avoid?

  • No latex
  • No fragrances
  • No chlorine
  • No phthalates

Are they biodegradable?

It doesn’t look like Sposie pads can be composted.

Where can I buy them?

You can buy Sposie booster pads on Sposie’s website, as well as Amazon, Target, and Walmart.

How much are they?

On Sposie’s own site, you can buy a pack of 32 booster pads for sizes newborn to 3 for around 28 dollars, which works out at about 87 cents per pad. 

The bottom line

There’s no doubt that Sposie pads aren’t the cheapest, but they’re great for little ones prone to leaks and no animals were harmed in their making!

5. The Honest Company Diapers

What materials do they use?

With a company name like Honest, I’d expect the brand to be completely clear about the materials used in their products and, luckily, they come through with a complete list of everything that’s used to make their diapers. While they’re not completely free from plastics, they use predominantly plant-based ingredients like wood pulp, along with inks for the designs (which are, admittedly, super cute). 

What do they avoid?

The Honest Company has made a promise to parents and carers not to use phthalates in their diapers. Another huge positive is that their wood pulp is completely chlorine-free and sourced from sustainably managed forests. They’re similarly free from fragrances, lotions, and latex, so they’re suitable for babies with sensitive skin. 

Are they biodegradable?

It’s great that the Honest Co. completely shuns chlorine bleaching and sources its wood pulp from sustainably managed forests, but their diapers are, unfortunately, not biodegradable. 

Where can I buy them?

Honest Company diapers, because of their huge popularity, can be found both in stores and online. You can buy their full range on Honest’s own site and they even offer a subscription service, so you’ll never be without! They’re also available in Target, Walgreens, and BuyBuy Baby stores, as well as on Amazon

How much are they?

Like some eco-friendlier diaper brands, Honest diapers aren’t the most budget-friendly, but they are about average for an eco-conscious brand. A single pack on the company’s own site will set you back about 47 cents per diaper on average and you can get 5% off the total cost if you subscribe. Looking at Amazon, prices range from about 32 to 59 cents per diaper depending on the size you need.  

The bottom line

The Honest Company’s use of sustainable wood pulp is great for the environment and they are, of course, cruelty-free, but it’s certainly a shame that they’re not biodegradable. 

6. Wholefoods Market 365 Diapers

What materials do they use?

Wholefoods, unfortunately, don’t make it easy to find a list of the materials they use in their own brand of diapers. In fact, despite searching all corners of the internet, I couldn’t find any information at all!

What do they avoid?

Despite not making the ingredients they do use clear, they’re quick to tell us what they avoid: chlorine, latex, and fragrances, making them hypoallergenic. I couldn’t find any information about phthalates, so I assume they could be used. Avoiding phthalates is a massive selling point, so I think brands would be silly not to shout about it if their products are phthalate-free!

Are they biodegradable?

365 Everyday Value diapers can’t be composted. 

Where can I buy them?

This brand is Wholefoods’ own diaper range, so they can only be bought in-store or online through Amazon Whole Foods Market with FREE 2-hour delivery on orders over $35 (offer valid at the time of publishing this post). 

How much are they?

The price ranges from 28-47 cents a diaper depending on the size you pick.

The bottom line

It’s great that they’re cruelty-free, but I find the lack of information regarding materials used a bit of a concern. Brands will pretty much always shout about it if they use plant-based ingredients, so I’m assuming these diapers use plastic primarily. I’d always go with a brand that makes their ingredients clear. When you’re putting your little one in them 24/7, it’s kinda crucial!

Diapers that work on obtaining PETA certificate:

The following brands state that their diapers are cruelty-free and that they’re working on gaining their PETA certification.

1. Dewor Baby Diapers

What materials do they use?

Dewor diapers are made primarily with silky soft bamboo. Bamboo’s a great material for diapers as it’s super absorbent and sustainable. They also feature super absorbent polymer, wood pulp, spandex, elastic sideband, safe adhesives. That’s a massive tick for Dewor in terms of transparency. 

What do they avoid?

Their diapers are completely free from fragrances, alcohol, preservatives, phthalates, chlorine, PVC, and antioxidants. Impressive!

Are they biodegradable?

The great thing about Dewor diapers is that they’re biodegradable. 

Where can I buy them?

Dewor baby diapers are available on Amazon and the brand’s own site.

How much are they?

Dewor diapers will set you back between 30 and 50 cents per diaper. This actually isn’t a bad price at all for organic, biodegradable, cruelty-free diapers!

The bottom line

Although Dewor isn’t certified by PETA yet, they are cruelty-free and are working on getting their certification. They’re great for baby’s skin, the environment, and your bank balance!

2. Bambo Nature Diapers

What materials do they use?

Bambo Nature makes their ingredients super transparent. Take note, other companies! These eco-friendly diapers are composed of elementally chlorine-free fluff, SAP, polypropylene, polyethylene (made with biodegradable materials), and elastane. It sounds good, but it’s a shame that they’re not totally free from chlorine!

What do they avoid?

Their diapers are free from phthalates (quite rightly), dyes, allergens, harmful chemicals, parabens, lotions, and artificial fragrances. They’re great for sensitive skin.

Are they biodegradable?

Bambo Nature diapers are made from 75% biodegradable materials and can be composted using a commercial service. Not only that, but 95% of all the waste produced during manufacturing is recycled, and they’re packed in packaging that can also be recycled. They’re showing off now!

Where can I buy them?

Bambo Nature diapers are available on the company’s own site and on Amazon

How much are they?

On Amazon, size 4 diapers work out at about 41 cents per diaper when you subscribe. That’s 6 packs of 30 diapers for about 72 dollars.

The bottom line

Bambo Nature diapers are a great cruelty-free diaper option. They also happen to be very eco-friendly as they can be composted and they’re not a bad price either!

Diapers brands that claim that their diapers are cruelty-free but do not have PETA 

These brands say that their products are cruelty-free, but don’t mention trying to obtain their PETA certification. That’s not to say that they’re not working on this; they just haven’t mentioned it on their sites.

1. Andy Pandy Diapers 

What materials do they use?

If Andy Pandy diapers were an artist, they’d be Beyonce: pretty much perfect in every way and we simply don’t deserve her…. I mean, them. They’re made with bamboo, totally chlorine-free fluff pulp, superabsorbent polymer (non-toxic), elastic, velcro tape, and adhesive. So nothing unnecessary and mostly plant-based.

What do they avoid?

  • No perfumes
  • No chlorine
  • No PVC
  • No latex
  • No preservatives
  • No phthalates
  • No alcohol
  • No antioxidants

Are they biodegradable?

Yes! Andy Pandy scores highly on all fronts. Not only are they cruelty-free and made with plant-based materials, but they’re about 86% biodegradable. 

Where can I buy them?

Andy Pandy diapers are available from the company’s own site and on Amazon

How much are they?

An XL pack of 62 diapers will set you back about 37 dollars: 61 cents per diaper.

The bottom line

If my Beyonce analogy didn’t make it obvious enough, I love Andy Pandy diapers! They don’t test on animals, most importantly, but they’re also great for sensitive skin and can be composted. They’re a great company who clearly care for our little ones’ skin and for the world around us. 

Read Next: Andy Pandy Diapers Review: The Best All-Around Diapers For Baby And For The Planet?

2. Little Toes Diapers

What materials do they use?

Little Toes Bamboo diapers are made, unsurprisingly, primarily with bamboo, along with a super-absorbent core and elastic waistband. 

What do they avoid?

  • No perfumes
  • No PVC
  • No latex
  • No preservatives
  • No chlorine
  • No phthalates
  • No alcohol
  • No antioxidants

They’re hypoallergenic, so perfect for little ones with sensitive skin. 

Are they biodegradable?

Little Toes’ diapers are indeed biodegradable!

Where can I buy them?

These diapers are available to buy on the company’s own site and on Amazon.

How much are they?

A 36 pack of newborn diapers costs about 19 dollars, so about 52 cents per diaper. This price increases to 61 cents per diaper when you need a large size. 

The bottom line

Little Toes are another fab cruelty-free diaper choice. The company clearly cares about your baby’s skin, as well as the impact disposable diapers have on the environment. The fact that they’re biodegradable is fantastic, although they’re not as readily available as other similar brands.

3. Nest Baby Diapers

What materials do they use?

Nest produces both diapers and training pants made with natural, sustainable materials like bamboo, wood, and cane, along with viscose, sodium polyacrylate (non-toxic), starch, polymer spandex, poly-propylene, elastin, and naturally derived synthetic rubber. 

What do they avoid?

This small family company stays away from harmful chemicals, lotions, allergens, and perfume, which all have the potential to irritate our little ones’ skin.  

Are they biodegradable?

While not all materials used in Nest baby diapers are biodegradable, they can be composted. They even provide certification to prove it! And just to add to their eco-credentials, their diapers are packaged in a recyclable bag.

Where can I buy them?

Nest Baby diapers are available on Amazon and on the company’s own site, with the company looking to launch a subscription service soon.

How much are they?

A case of 120 size 2 diapers will set you back about 57 dollars, so about 47 cents per diaper. This is about average in terms of eco-friendly diaper prices.

The Bottom line

I love any diaper that can be composted, so this is a great cruelty-free diaper choice. They also provide lots of advice about how to go about composting your (non-poopy) diapers.

4. Earth + Eden Baby Diapers

What materials do they use?

Earth and Eden, as their name would suggest, come through when it comes to transparency and caring about what we put on our babies’ skin. They list all of their ingredients on their site, which includes sustainably-sourced elemental chlorine-free fluff, non-toxic absorbent polymer, chlorine-free cotton layer, polypropylene fabrics, latex-free elastics, safe adhesives, and inks made without lead and heavy metals. 

What do they avoid?

These diapers avoid fragrances, parabens, latex, and 26 allergens known to irritate babies’ skin. And, most importantly, they avoid animal testing!

Are they biodegradable?

Unfortunately, Earth and Eden diapers can’t be composted.

Where can I buy them?

Earth and Eden diapers are available on Amazon and on Diaper Dabbler – a diaper sample site which is great for trying out new brands before committing to one type!

How much are they?

A pack of 164 size 4 diapers works out at just 26 cents per diaper. That’s a fantastic price, especially for a diaper that’s kinder to the environment.

The bottom line

It’s a shame that Earth and Eden diapers aren’t biodegradable, but they’re certainly kinder to the world around us than many other brands, and they’re great for little ones with sensitive skin. And all at a really great price! I’m a fan. 

5. Eco by Naty Diapers

What materials do they use?

Despite naming themselves ‘No. 1 Eco Diaper’, Eco by Naty doesn’t provide a full list of materials used in their diapers. They state that they’re made with 100% Forest Steward Council certified wood pulp, superabsorbents (polymer) and that’s about it. Naty says that this polymer has been ‘thoroughly tested’ when it comes to toxicity.

What do they avoid?

Naty tells us that your baby won’t have any oil-based plastics ‘on their skin’ when wearing their diapers. Sounds perfect… until you read that they use plant-based plastics in their diapers ‘where possible’. So this must mean that oil-based plastics are used somewhere, which is pretty misleading as marketing goes! A clever way to sell them though, I’ll give them that.

Related Post: Eco By Naty Diapers Review 2021: The Number 1 Eco Diaper?

Are they biodegradable?

Eco by Naty diapers can’t be composted, which is kinda weird considering their claim to be the number 1 eco diaper!

Where can I buy them?

You can buy Eco by Naty diapers from Amazon, on the brand’s own website, and in large grocery chains like Walgreens and Walmart. 

How much are they?

Looking at Naty diapers on Amazon, 100 newborn diapers will cost you about 30 dollars – about 30 cents a diaper. Larger sizes cost more, as is usually the case with all brands; 132 size 5s work out at about 56 cents each. Of course, you can save up to 20% if you’re signed up for Amazon’s Family Program

The bottom line

Eco by Naty are certified vegan, which means they’re not tested on animals. This is great, but it’s a shame they’re not also biodegradable. They kinda have to be if they’re gonna live up to their no 1 eco diaper name!

6. Eco Pea Diapers

What Materials Do They Use?

Like so many other amazing eco-friendly diaper companies, Eco Pea use soft bamboo to make their diapers. Bamboo actually takes in more carbon dioxide than some other trees and plants and doesn’t require pesticides to grow, so it’s a fab alternative to plastic. 

What Do They Avoid?

They steer completely clear of chlorine bleaching, phthalates, fragrances, lotions, heavy metal dyes (they use water-based inks instead), and gluten. Oh, and animal testing too, of course.

Are They Biodegradable?

Eco Pea diapers are biodegradable. They should start to break down in a matter of months, rather than the years it takes for plastic diapers.

Where Can I Buy Them?

Eco Pea diapers are currently only available on their website.

How Much Are They?

Eco Pea diapers, depending on the size you need, will set you back between 44 and 68 cents per diaper. This is pretty in-line with similar brands.

The Bottom Line

Eco Pea might not be certified by PETA just yet, but they’re clearly a very ethical, cruelty-free company. They’ve said ‘heck no’ to toxins and produced a super soft diaper that’s good for your baby and good for the planet. Okay, not good. Great.

What other types of products are tested on animals?

We all know that some beauty products are still tested on animals. Why I don’t know – it’s 2021! Some companies have either always been vegan and/or cruelty-free – Pacifica, Elf, The Body Shop, NYX, and Kat Von D, to name a few – or have moved away from animal testing over the years. But some others still have a long way to go, including Estee Lauder, Clinique, Bobbi Brown, and Maybelline, who all carry out animal testing. And it’s not like these brands don’t have the ways and means to avoid it… 

Apart from beauty, many household cleaning brands carry out animal testing, including Pledge, Febreze, Windex, Tide, and Dawn. Luckily, there are so many cruelty-free options when it comes to cleaners that you can still have a sparking home… just without the torture and stuff. Dr Bronner’s, Astonish, and Molly’s Suds are just a few companies leading the way when it comes to cruelty-free cleaning!

Unfortunately, it’s not just beauty products and cleaning products we have to worry about. The list of brands who test on animals includes such household names as Mars, Trojan, Iams, Splenda, and Kleenex. Tissues, chocolate, and sweetener? I don’t get it, either.

There’s so much information online now about which companies still test on animals, and which are safe to buy. If you’re ever in doubt about a favorite brand, contact them!

The more consumers demand cruelty-free products, the more pressure we put on brands who still test to move towards cruelty-free production. 

Frequently Asked Questions About Cruelty-Free Diapers

1. Can I trust a product label that says “No animal Testing”?

You’d think ‘no animal testing’ would mean just that, right? Surprisingly, not always… 

Be careful with companies who label their products this way. Peta explains how there aren’t any regulations involved when it comes to labeling products ‘cruelty-free’. To gain Peta’s certification, a brand has to ensure its ingredients, suppliers, formulas and the finished product are all completely cruelty-free. Any company that doesn’t appear on Peta’s list of cruelty-free brands could claim that their ‘finished product’ isn’t tested on animals, but the materials or ingredients used to make it are tested instead. 

If you’re ever in doubt about your favorite brands, it’s a good idea to contact them directly. Make sure you ask whether any ingredients or materials used are tested on animals, as well as the finished product!

2. Are all cruelty-free products vegan?

You’d think that any products labeled cruelty-free would be vegan too, considering ingredients like milk and wool are involve unimaginable animal cruelty, including removing calves from their moms so that humans can drink their milk instead. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case. Products can be labeled cruelty-free, but still contain animal products. Common culprits in beauty products are beeswax and cochineal, a red dye made by crushing certain female bugs. Nice. 

Again, if a product’s vegan, it’ll probably be labeled as such; it’s a huge selling point! But if you’re not sure, just contact the company.

3. Are all vegan products cruelty-free?

Sort of… a company shouldn’t be labeling their products vegan if there’s any kind of animal testing involved, either with the ingredients or the finished product, obviously. And a vegan product should be completely free from any animal byproducts, including milk, honey, and beeswax. But that won’t stop brands who technically offer these products, but who are owned by corporations who do carry out animal testing, from labeling their products cruelty-free and vegan. If the item you’re looking at is labeled as such but is owned by a worldwide umbrella company, like Procter and Gamble, for example, you could argue that it’s not strictly vegan. 

Having said that, those living a vegan lifestyle for ethical reasons shouldn’t stress about being perfect. If you can avoid these brands, that’s great, but choosing products labeled ‘vegan’, regardless of these umbrella companies, still makes a huge difference. Again, we have to vote with our dollars. The more consumers choose vegan and cruelty-free products, the more choice we’ll have!

4. Are Pampers cruelty-free? 

Pampers diapers are owned by Procter & Gamble, a huge multi-brand corporation. They also own well-known brands like Olay, Head and Shoulders, and Pantene. So, do they test? The company states that they don’t test on animals unless required to do so by law’. Don’t let this statement fool you. These brands are sold around the world and many countries make it a legal requirement for brands to test certain products on animals before selling to the public. So what Procter & Gamble is trying to say in response to this question is yes, yes we do test on animals. There’s simply no excuse for multi-billion dollar corporations like this to still be selling cruel products. Vote with your dollars and choose cruelty-free! 

5. Are Huggies cruelty-free?

It’s no surprise that Huggies, the other global diaper brand, isn’t cruelty-free. When asked about their animal testing policies, Huggies offered a very confusing and contradictory statement. They say that they ‘do not test Huggies on animals’ but ‘animals may be used in testing to ensure the safety of some raw materials when suitable alternatives are not available and the testing is mandated by regulatory authorities’. 

To put it plainly, although they don’t dress animals in their diapers, the materials used to make the diapers are tested on animals when ‘required’. To put it bluntly, yes, they do test on animals and, no, they’re not cruelty-free. Again, the money and resources at Huggies’ disposal are huge. They should be putting ethics before profit and not selling in countries which ‘require’ this cruel and completely outdated practice. 

6. Are babyganics diapers cruelty-free? 

You’d expect big things from a company on a mission to ‘raise the next generation of healthy, happy babies’. While Babyganics diapers are certified organic, they don’t make their ingredients list readily available for parents and carers, It’s only with lots of digging that I managed to find a list, which includes totally chlorine-free fluff pulp, non-latex elastic, and NeoNourish seed oil. But what about animal testing?

Unfortunately, that’s where my time as a diaper Sherlock Holmes ended. I couldn’t find any information about animal testing or whether their diapers are vegan, nada. If cruelty-free is a priority for you (and hopefully, it is!), I’d stay away from any company that doesn’t make this clear. Staying away from animal testing is certainly something to shout about, so if a brand is indeed cruelty-free, it seems strange that they wouldn’t display this on their packaging or site – in huge capital letters, so you just can’t miss it!

7. Are Parasol diapers cruelty-free?

Parasol diapers are indeed cruelty-free; they tell us on their site that they do not use any animal testing or products in the manufacture of their diapers. Their diapers are also hypoallergenic, totally chlorine-free, and free from chemicals, dyes, lotions, latex, parabens, alcohol, phthalates (amazing), and heavy metals. 

8. Does Seventh Generation test on animals?

In a blog from 2015, Seventh Generation explains how they’ve been ‘committed to animal rights’ and they’ve been ‘working to build a future free of animal cruelty’. The company says that, since they were founded in 1988, they’ve never conducted any animal testing on their ingredients or finished products, including their diapers and household cleaning products. So far, so good… until 2016, when Seventh Generation was acquired by Unilever. Like Procter and Gamble, Unilever owns a whole host of well-known brands, including Comfort, Domestos, and Simple. And like Procter and Gamble, Unilever does unfortunately still conduct animal testing. 

9. Is the Honest company cruelty-free?

Honest Company diapers are completely cruelty-free. The brand states clearly on their site that they don’t test on animals ‘during product development or production’ or ‘allow third parties to do so’. They explain how they steer completely clear of commonly used animal byproducts like gelatin, carmine (cochineal), beeswax, lanolin, and honey. It’d be so much easier to choose cruelty-free options if every brand made their animal testing stance so clear!

Conclusion

We’re all used to hearing the term ‘cruelty-free’ when we talk about beauty products and even cleaning products. Who knew we had to consider cruelty-free baby diapers too? It’s pretty horrible that animal testing is still carried out for any products, period, but there are so many diaper brands that care about their impact on animals, as well as our little ones’ health and the environment, that it’s actually super easy to find cruelty-free diapers that work for you!

Brands who are cruelty-free will usually make it very clear in their marketing. After all, it’s a huge selling point! But check PETA’s site for more information about cruelty-free products in general and don’t hesitate to contact companies and ask them if there’s any testing involved in their individual materials or finished products. It’s so important for us to choose cruelty-free when we can; the more we choose products that stay away from animal testing, the more companies who still test will realize that to put it plainly, they should stop. 

I hope that global brands with the ways and means to move away from animal testing, not just on their diaper ingredients, but on all the products they offer, start to do so. I, for one, wouldn’t enjoy being locked in a cage my whole life, having various needles and chemicals tested on me daily, all for a product that could be produced safely without this horrendous treatment. It’s a truly horrific practice and with so many advances in technology and science, surely we can leave it behind? And yes, we’re talking to you, Huggies and Pampers. If it wasn’t obvious…

References

  1. Jaakkola, J. J., & Khinght, T. L. (2008). The role of exposure to phthlates from polyvinyl chloride products in the development of asthma and allergies: a systematic review and metaanalysis. Environ Health Perspect, 116(7), 845-53.

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